photography technique

Photographic techniques:

Zooming
Zooming is a technique that makes the main object clear, while the background looks blurry. This technique serves to reinforce the object and make it more striking. Changing the focal length can only be done with a zoom lens, use a shutter speed of no more than 1/30 second to produce an impression of motion, you should wear a tripod.

Panning Technique
In this technique the moving object will look sharp, while the still background looks blurred. Must follow the object when aiming, to get the photo to the maximum: use a low speed (8-60) and use a tripod.

Freezing technique
This technique is a technique of shooting moving objects using very high speeds. This technique seems to freeze the motion of the object. The result of this technique is an object that looks sharp when it is moving.

Macro Technique
Macro photo technique is a technique of shooting at very close distances, so that objects look very large, this technique usually uses macro type techniques.

Silhouette Technique
Silhouette means shadow. Like the designation the silhouette photo is only a shadow. A silhouette is an object that covers light so that it is illuminated from behind in total. The basic rule of silhouette photos is that objects must really look black. This means there is no beam of light that breaks in.

Bulb technique
The shutter speed can be adjusted according to the time you want, done by holding the shutter release button for longer, you can use a release cable and tripod

Field of View
Field of view is a general composition that is seen from the size of the lens distance to the object. This means that an object can be photographed at very close, near, far or very far. The following are the types of field of fiew that are commonly used.
1. Extreme Close Up
The object is photographed at a very close distance so that detailed objects such as the texture or wrinkle of the face are clearly visible.
2. Head Shot
The photo limit is from the top of the head to the chin.
3. Close up
The object is shot with a boundary from the top of the head to the shoulder.
4. Medium Close up
Limitation of photos with this composition is from the top of the head to the chest.
5. Mid Shot
The object is photographed with a limit from the top of the head to the waist. Also called a half body photo.
6. Medium Shot
The object is photographed with a limit from the top of the head to the knee. This photo is also called a three-quarter photo of the body.
7. Full Shot
The objects in this composition are photographed with boundaries from the top of the head to the toes. This photo is also called a photo of the whole body.
8. Long Shot
Shooting is taken very far from the object. The resulting photo will have a very large background portion, while the main object looks small.

Shooting angle
The angle of shooting is a way of looking or positioning the camera when shooting. There are three commonly known shooting angles.
1. Bird eye
Bird eye is a shooting angle where the camera position is above the object
2. Eye level
Eye level is a normal viewing angle that positions the camera parallel to the object.
3. Frog Eye
Frog eye is a shooting angle where the camera position is under the object

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